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Some interesting information on new Industrial Hemp law here in Oregon...

House Bill 4089  (Industrial Hemp)

House Bill 4089 is a multifaceted bill that was brought by the Oregon Hemp Farers Association. When we first saw this bill last month, we noted that although it was comprehensive in scope, it did not include a provision limiting the ability of hemp growers to sell high THC products, or tracking provisions related to the movement of hemp into OLCC channels. Maybe Salem was listening, because the legislature fixed both issues.

Below is everything of note in HB 4089, with comments on the big moves in bold.

  • Names the hemp research program operated by the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) the Oregon Industrial Hemp Agricultural Pilot Program.
  • Clarifies ODA’s authority to administer the program. Specifies that agricultural hemp seed is agricultural or flower seed for the purposes of statutes regulating labeling, testing, or certifying seeds.
  • Directs the Director of Agriculture and Dean of College of Agricultural Sciences of Oregon State University to establish a program for labeling and certifying agricultural hemp seed.
  • Provides that an accredited independent testing laboratory that has been approved by OHA or ODA may test industrial hemp and industrial hemp commodities and products produced or processed by a grower, handler, or agricultural hemp seed producer.
  • Transfers responsibility from the testing laboratory to the registered grower, handler, or processor, for entering hemp, commodity, or product into the tracking system before the hemp, commodity, or product is transferred to a laboratory for testing.
  • Requires the OLCC to track the hemp, commodity, or product when it is transferred, sold, or transported to a licensed premises, or area under the control of the premises licensee. This is an expansion of OLCC’s current obligation to track all cannabis in the state, with the exception of home grow and limited medical grow.
  • Specifies that industrial hemp products that contain more than 0.3 percent tetrahydrocannabinol may not be sold to a consumer by a person other than a retailer, and requires that the OLCC adopt rules to ensure compliance. This shores up a huge gap: until now, ODA growers could theoretically sell these products without oversight.
  • Authorizes OLCC actions regarding industrial hemp to enforce and ensure compliance with marijuana laws and provisions of industrial hemp laws that incorporate requirements, restrictions, or other provisions of marijuana laws.More oversight for OLCC.
  • Specifies that a person may not produce, process, or store homemade industrial hemp extracts. This further curtails ODA growers’ options, which were nearly limitless under state law.
  • Changes the description of the limit on production and storage of homegrown cannabis plants.
  • Allows ODA to adopt rules establishing a higher average tetrahydrocannabinol concentration limit for industrial hemp if a higher average concentration limit is established by federal law.
  • Revises language regarding grower retention of agricultural hemp seed for producing industrial hemp.
  • Establishes the Industrial Hemp Fund and appropriates moneys to ODA to implement, administer, and enforce industrial hemp statutes.

Like SB 1555, the hemp bill is “emergency” legislation that is effective on passage. When coupled with the new OLCC rules around industrial hemp passed a few months back, it’s safe to say that the Oregon hemp program is fully formed at last. Like the marijuana programs, Oregon hemp has come a long way.


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